"> Titi Omo-Ettu
       

Welcome to The B&B GUEST HOUSE, IJEBU-ODE

April 28, 2021

.

.
Welcome Glee ( Musical )
.


.
.


.

.

.

.
Welcome to the cyberspace location of B&B GUEST HOUSE, IJEBU-ODE.
.

.

.

The B&B GUEST HOUSE CREW
.
Bose, Michael, Kemi, Peace, Bisi, Kenny, & Blessing
.

.

.

.
Bisi, Blessing, Peace, Bose, & Kemi.
.

From left to right

Kenny Bassey (Sanitation)
Adesuwa Irere (Customer Service)
Peace Osiba (Manager)
Ayanfe Lamidi (Meals)
Oriyomi Lawal (Utilities)
.

.

CONTACT US
0818 344 3129
0815 636 7975
bbguesthouse001@gmail.com
.

.


.
About The B&B
.

The B&B is a BED and BREAKFAST facility

It flaunts the story of a place built to HOST you when you are out in IJEBU-ODE and you must enjoy a good night over after your main business for being around.

In a few ways, it is a HIDEOUT.

One, It is located in a serene community where all that goes on is PEACE

It is in a community where noise, auto-horns, human fisticufs are BANNED.

It has deliberate SECURITY, 24 hours of electricity, midnight entertainment and breakfast that starts from 6am and ends at lunch time.

It is also a SMALL PARTY VENUE
Small as in number of guests the host has chosen, and no more.

You choose how you want the party to be and we PLAN and DELIVER it to your taste.

When you are around, you are part of OUR FAMILY

A family that spent several years to think out and build the VILLAGE FACILITY.

By the time we are done with the B&B vision, it will be a place to Come And Live And Be At Rest (CALABAR)

B&B is all YOURS
.
Location:
Odolegan Quarters,
Opposite Equity Resort (Formerly Gateway) Hotel
Erunwon Road
Ijebu-Ode

0818 344 3129
0815 636 7975
.
GPS location
6°50’31.6″N 3°57’31.5″E
Erunwon
https://goo.gl/maps/TZP6GpfwykANTsaT7
.
Google Road Guide:
.

.

Now the PLACE for your BIRTHDAY, WEDDING PHOTOSHOOTS
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
Please COME IN
.

.

.

.

.

.

.
Dusk to Dawn
.

.

.

.

.

.

.
Good Morning at the B&B
.
Ozana by Hotkid( Musical)
.


.
Goke agba, moni ma nilari
Magoke agba, moni ma nilari

Magoke agba, moni ma nilari
Magoke agba, moni ma nilari

I tell you back in the days
When me dey Ebute meta
The niggas wey dey oh
Dem no dey follow me play (never)
Folake sofunmi pe
Hotkid please please dey go your way (later)
Now we hustle for pay oh
Now the hustle don dey pay

So I be like oh mama
Mum see your boy don dey global now
We dey go far now
See the kind place we dey shut down now, yeh

We started from instagram
Take a look at me now I’m a super star
We dey go far now
See the kind place we dey shut down now (yeh)

So I be like ozana, ozana, ozana
Omo your boy don dey go far
Ozana, ozana, ozana
Omo your boy don dey kill shows
Ozana, ozana, ozana
Omo your boy don dey shut down
Ozana, ozana, ozana
Iyeee

Ewo bi…
.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.
For less than N12,000, we pamper you one DAY, one NIGHT.
.
There is a video on instagram at
https://www.instagram.com/p/CCZd46inQ2U/?igshid=17w3ec9754oa3
.
IJEBU, IJEBU-ODE

Ijebu people are considered to be the first among the Yoruba speakers to come into contact with the Europeans, who came to them in the beginning of the 14th century. Ijebu Empire has always been (and still is) an organized and strong nation that was able to protect itself from harm. The nation was divided into five parts: Ijebu-Igbo, Ijebu-Ife, Ijebu-Ososa, Ijebu-Ode and Ijebu-Remo. (Somehow the author does not include Ijebu Waterside) Now, it remains the largest ethnic group among all Yoruba people.

What is curious – Ijebus were the first Yoruba-speaking people to invent money. The empire was big on metal work and metal production, so it is not surprising at all that it decided to create their own coins. They were called Owo Ijebu, and many nations in Africa and Europe accepted the coins. There was also money made out of cowry shells that were called Owo Eyo. It was also accepted in many Yoruba kingdoms.

IJEBU-ODE is a historic Yoruba town in Ogun State, which was established in the 16th century. It is about 15 minutes away from Ijebu Igbo. The city is located between Benin City and Shagamu. It is considered to be the largest town where Ijebus live. It is also known for being the capital of Ijebuland. The Ijebu Kingdom ruler or Awujale, has his residence there.

Today, it is a quiet and cozy city in southwestern Nigeria, which lures people in with its history, culture and tranquility.
.

.

Understandably the largest city inhabited by the Ijebus, a sub-group of the Yoruba ethnic group who speak the Ijebu dialect of Yoruba, it is historically and culturally the headquarters of Ijebuland. The name “Ijebu-Ode” is a combination of the names of two persons namely, AJEBU and OLODE who were conspicuous as leaders of the original settlers and founders of the town.
(**Taken from three separate but consensual accounts on the subject).
.



.

.

.

.

.

.

.
History

THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND’S DETOUR TO IJEBU-ODE DURING NIGERIAN STATE VISIT IN 1956

A state visit from the Queen of England is a rare thing indeed, but it did happen when the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth, paid a special visit to Nigeria for the first time on the 28th of January, 1956, four years to Nigeria’s independence.

She was received with a lot of fanfare and was greeted at the Ikeja Airport, Lagos, with a military parade and by dignitaries such as the then Governor-General, Sir James Robertson, his wife, the Minister of Labour, Festus Okotie-Eboh and the Oba of Benin, Oba Akenzua II. She stayed for 20 days and was supposed to visit only Ibadan, Enugu, and Kaduna as the regional capitals.

What many never knew was that she insisted that a private visit to a private individual must be written into her itinerary. It was scripted that she said, “That man used to walk me within the (Buckingham) Palace when I was a toddler”. She therefore made a scheduled stop in Ijebu Ode and stayed the night.

This visit was for a special man, Chief Timothy Adeola Odutola, the Ogbeni Oja, her father’s friend who usually wined and dined with the royals at Buckingham Palace.
.

.

.

Chief Timothy Adeola Odutola attended St Saviours Primary School, Italupe and Ijebu-Ode Grammar School. He started work in the Colonial service and later went into business selling damask and fish. He became a Produce buyer opening large storage units and transportation lines. Chief Odutola became so wealthy that he had a personal bond with George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth. By 1960 he had created a conglomerate including three factories, a retail franchise, a cattle ranch, a 5,000-acre rubber and palm oil plantation, a sawmill, and export business.

He established Olu-Iwa College and Ijebu-Ode Secondary Commercial College both of which he merged in 1964 to become Adeola Odutola Comprehensive College, now Adeola Odutola College and Schools, Ijebu-Ode.

Chief Odutola was one of the pioneers of Nigerian business, and one of the richest men in Nigeria.

He was responsible for establishing various factories in the country, spanning the transport and food industry, He was a member and later President of the Nigerian Stock Exchange and the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria in the early 70s.

.

The Queen passed a night at Ijebu-Ode and Chief Odutola was forever remembered as a legend. He was dubbed “Eni ti Oba Obirin wa ki lati ilu Oyinbo” (The man the Queen came to Visit from the land of the Whites).

***(some text taken from herald.ng)
.

.

.

Legends of Juju music

A PROFILE
EBENEZER OBEY, born 3 April 1942 as Ebenezer Remilekun Aremu Olasupo Obey-Fabiyi, MFR in Idogo, Nigeria), nicknamed the “Chief Commander”, is a Nigerian jùjú musician.

He began his professional career in the mid-1950s after moving to Lagos. After tutelage under Fatai Rolling-Dollar’s band, he formed a band called The International Brothers in 1964, playing highlife–jùjú fusion. The band later metamorphosed into Inter-Reformers in the early-1970s, with a long list of Juju album hits on the West African Decca musical label.

Obey began experimenting with Yoruba percussion style and expanding on the band by adding more drum kits, guitars and talking drums. Obey’s musical strengths lie in weaving intricate Yoruba axioms into dance-floor compositions. As is characteristic of Nigerian Yoruba social-circle music, the Inter-Reformers band excel in praise-singing for rich Nigerian socialites and business tycoons. Obey, however, is also renowned for Christian spiritual themes in his music and has since the early-1990s retired into Nigerian gospel music ministry. It will be worthy of note to also say that Chief Commander just as he is fondly called by his fans, has played alongside popular gospel music veteran, Pastor Kunle Ajayi during his 30 years on stage concert in Lagos.
Source: wikipedia.

Legends of Juju music

A PROFILE
KING SUNNY ADE, born September 22 1946 as Chief Sunday Adeniyi Adegeye, MFR, is a Nigerian jùjú singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. He is regarded as one of the first African pop musicians to gain international success, and has been called one of the most influential musicians of all time.

Sunny Adé formed his own backing band in 1967, eventually known as his African Beats. After achieving national success in Nigeria during the 1970s and founding his own independent label, he signed to Island Records in 1982 and achieved international success with the albums Juju Music (1982) and Synchro System (1983); the latter garnered him a Grammy nomination, a first for a Nigerian artist. His 1998 album Odu also garnered a Grammy nomination.

After the death of Bob Marley, Island Records began looking for another third world artist to put on its contract, while Fela Kuti had just been signed by Arista Records. Producer Martin Meissonnier introduced King Sunny Adé to Chris Blackwell, leading to the release of Juju Music in 1982. Robert Palmer claims to have brought King Sunny Adé to Island’s attention, his familiarity being from his life on Malta in the 60s listening to African Radio and Armed Forces Radio. Sunny Adé gained a wide following with this album and was soon billed as “the African Bob Marley”.

Sunny Adé has said that his refusal to allow Island to meddle with his compositions and over-Europeanise and Americanise his music were the reasons why Island then decided to look elsewhere.

1987 comeback

In 1987, Sunny Adé returned to the international spotlight when Rykodisc released a recording of a live concert he did in Seattle.

He soon employed an American manager, Andrew Frankel, who negotiated another three album record deal with the Mesa record label (a division of Paradise Group) in America. One of these albums was 1988’s Odu, a collection of traditional Yoruba songs, for which he was nominated for the second Grammy Award and thus making him the first African to be nominated twice for a Grammy. Apart from being an international musician Sunny Adé is also prominent in his native Nigeria, running multiple companies in several industries, creating a non-profit organisation called the King Sunny Adé Foundation, and working with the Musical Copyright Society of Nigeria.

In recent times, hip hop music appears to be holding sway with the electronic media in Nigeria with massive airplays. Nonetheless, Sunny Adé’s musical output has continued to inspire a vast generation of other Nigerian musicians, who believe in the big band musical set up which Sunny Adé and late Fela Kuti are noted for. The musician Lagbaja is one of the many musicians whom Sunny Adé’s music has inspired. In 2008, his contributions to world music was recognised; as he was given an award for his outstanding contribution to world music at the International Reggae and World Music Awards held at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York.

2009 comeback

At the beginning of another round of tour of the United States and Canada, Sunny Adé, now known as The Chairman in his home country, was appointed a visiting professor of music at the Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife. In July of that same year, King Sunny Adé was inducted into the Afropop Hall of Fame, at the Brooklyn African Festival in the United States. He dedicated the award to Michael Jackson.
Source wikipedia
.

.

“IYE JEMILA” (lyrics)
by Victor Olaiya

Kanran ko faya reni sotun le fun yen romo oko A fo ko faya reni sotun le fun yen ralakora Kanran ko faya reni o, sotun lo fun yen romo oko (yeparipasa) Iye jemila, iye jemila, baba jemila (Wo se we tan) Iye jemila, iye jemila, baba jemila Mo d’ogoji naira mese (Iye jemila, iye jemila, baba jemila)
Fo kin fi ne omo re wo ko

(Iye jemila, iye jemila, baba jemila) Wo ke mo fo oruwo kan soso raa ne (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Ee si oruwo meji raa ne (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Aare, ko de ti ri kio se waami ke? (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Wo ke mo fo omi rawa edaa wa (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Se ami san kaakiri aye

(Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila)

Kaa ba pade loke (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Dandan ni ka pade lodo (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Kaa ba l’eko (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Dandan ni ka la pade n’ijebu (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Kaa de pade n’ijebu ke (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) Dandan ni ka la pade ni stadium hotel (Iye jemila iye jemila baba jemila) E buru o, woo se o (Iye jemla iye jemila baba jemila
.

Share via:

39 thoughts on "Welcome to The B&B GUEST HOUSE, IJEBU-ODE"

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

 

 


      Connect with Me

      Copyright. Titi Omo-Ettu. Designed by Paschal Agonsi.